Syllabus in Business History

The Business History Conference has a collection of Syllabus with miscellaneous topics, which serve as guidelines for those constructing courses. I pick some that I am interested (mainly about Japan)

Unnatural Persons: The Company in Historical and Social Context (2008) David Brunner (Harvard University)

IV. THE COMPANY IN JAPAN

Session 16: Historical Perspectives
♦ Yootaroo Sakudoo. “The Management Practices of Family Business.” In Chie Nakane and Shinzaburoo Ooishi, eds. Tokugawa Japan: The Social and Economic Antecedents of Modern Japan. University of Tokyo Press, 1990. Harvard Libraries.
♦ James C. Abegglen. The Japanese Factory: Aspects of its Social Organization. Glencoe, IL: Free Press, 1958. Read in entirety. Harvard Libraries.

Session 17: Crisis and Reform (10 Apr)
♦ Stephen K. Vogel. Japan Remodeled: How Government and Industry are Reforming Japanese Capitalism. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 2006. Read chapters 1, 2 and 5. Harvard Libraries.
♦ T. Inagami and D. Hugh Whittaker. The New Community Firm: Employment, Governance and Management Reform in Japan. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge UP, 2005. Read chapters 2, 3 and 5. Harvard Libraries. Session 18: Japanese Companies Today: Hitachi (15 Apr)
♦ T. Inagami and D. Hugh Whittaker. The New Community Firm: Employment, Governance and Management Reform in Japan. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge UP, 2005. Read chapters 8-13. Harvard Libraries.

Session 19: Japanese Companies Today: Toyota (17 Apr)
♦ Harvard Business School. “Toyota Motor Manufacturing, U.S.A., Inc.” Case number 9-693-019. 1995.
♦ Paul S. Adler, Barbara Goldoftas, and David I. Levine. “Flexibility versus Efficiency? A Case Study of Model Changeovers in the Toyota Production System.” Organization Science 10 (1) 43- 68.

Session 20: Theorizing about the Japanese Company (22 Apr)
♦ Ronald Dore. Stock Market Capitalism: Welfare Capitalism. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000. Read chapter 2. Harvard Libraries.
♦ Masahiko Aoki. “Toward an Economic Model of the Japanese Firm.” Journal of Economic Literature 28 (1) 1-27.

 

East Asian Organizations in Comparative Perspective (2007) Julian Dierkes (University of British Columbia)

“Japanese Management”

Required readings:

Recommended readings:

  • Ahmadjian and Lincoln, “Keiretsu, governance, and learning: Case studies in change from the Japanese automotive industry“, Organization Science, 12 (2001): 683-701.
  • Michael Gerlach, “The Japanese Corporate Network“, Administrative Science Quarterly, 37 (1992): 105-139.
  • James Lincoln, Gerlach and Ahmadjian, “Keiretsu Networks and Corporate Performance in Japan“, American Sociological Review, 61 (1996): 67-88.
  • Lincoln and Gerlach, Japan’s Network Economy – Structure, Persistence, and Change. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
  • Aviad Raz, Emotions at Work: Normative Control, Organizations, and Culture in Japan and America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Asia Center, 2002: “Introduction” and “Design, Devotion, and Defiance” (esp. 1-54).
  • Eleanor Westney, “Japanese Enterprise Faces the Twenty-First Century” in DiMaggio, ed. The Twenty-First-Century Firm. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.
  • James Womack, Daniel Jones and Daniel Roos, The Machine That Changed the World. New York: HarperCollins, 1991: Chpts. 3, 4, 6 (48-103, 138-168).

 

Varieties of Capitalism in East Asia (2008) Myung-Koo Kang (Stanford University)

Japan (I): Origins of the Japanese Model
a. Pre-WWII System 
**Streeck, W., K. Yamamura, et al. (2002). The Origins of Nonliberal Capitalism: Germany and Japan in Comparison, Cornell University Press: 1-38.
**Noguchi, Y. (1998). “The 1940 System: Japan under the Wartime Economy.” The American Economic Review 88(2): 404-407.
**Kerde, Ortrud (1999), “The Ideological Background of the Japanese War Economy: Visions of the „reformist bureaucrats‟, in Erich Pauer ed., Japan‟s War Economy, pp. 23-38 [available at SUL ebrary]
*Johnson, C. A. (1982). MITI and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of Industrial Policy, 1925- 1975. Stanford, Calif., Stanford University Press

b. Post-WWII System: Continuity vs. Discontinuity 
**Vogel, S. K. (2006). Japan Remodeled: How Government and Industry are Reforming Japanese Capitalism, Cornell University Press: 1-19.
**Aoki, M. (March 1990), “Toward an Economic Model of Japanese Firm,” Journal of Economic Literature, 28 (1): 1-27. [jstore]
**Kojima, Kiyoshi (2000), “The “Flying Geese” Model of Asian Economic Development: Origin, Theoretical Extensions, and Regional Policy Implications,” Journal of Asian Economics 11 (4): 375-401 [online source]
#Murakami, Y., H. T. Patrick, et al. (1987). The Political Economy of Japan. Stanford, Calif., Stanford University Press.
#Tabb, William K. (1995), The Postwar Japanese System: Cultural Economy and Economic Transformation, New York; Oxford University Press: 35-111.

Japan (II): Japan Remodeled? Or End of the Japanese Model?
a. The Lost Decade Debate
**Vogel, S. K. (2006). Japan Remodeled: How Government and Industry are Reforming Japanese Capitalism: 22-114.
**Vogel, S.K. (2007), “Why Free Markets Need More Rules” [Barma & Vogel, pp.341-354] *Katz, Richard, Japanese Phoenix (2002): 3-22.
*Grimes, William, Unmaking the Japanese Miracle (2001): xv-xix, 1-29, 218-29. *Posen, Adam (1998). Restoring Japan’s Economic Growth: 143-57.
#Pempel, T.J. “Regime Shift: Japanese Politics in a Changing World Economy,” Journal of Japanese Studies (Summer 1997): 333-61.

b. Recent Reforms: Japan rebounding? (2/12)
**Vogel, S. K. (2006). Japan Remodeled: How Government and Industry are Reforming Japanese Capitalism: 115-224.
*Murphy, R. T. and A. Mikuni (2002). Japan’s Policy Trap: Dollars, Deflation, and the Crisis of Japanese Finance, Brookings Institution Press

 

2017/09/18 Update

undergraduate economic history syllabus for 2017-2018 from Chris Colvin

 

PS. Research Resources: Datasets

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